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Remineralize the soil!

October 09, 2014

Glacial Rock Dust is a natural mineral product which is produced over many thousands of years by glacial action. It is made from a wide variety of rocks which contain a broad spectrum of trace minerals that are collected and pulverized by the expansion/contraction action of the glacier. As the glacier recedes, it leaves behind deposits of “glacial moraine”. Glacial Rock Dust is organic and loaded with essential nutrients that it releases slowly so your plants can be healthy throughout the growing season. Add as a soil amendment to your garden, raised beds, or container garden to improve the quality of your soil and add essential minerals to your harvested fruits and vegetables. It will enhance flavor in your harvest....

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Pumice as a soil conditioner?

October 09, 2014

Pumice rock is a natural type of volcanic igneous rock which is formed from molten or partially molten material. It is a great soil conditioner, as it is highly porous, giving it excellent water and air exchange properties. The root systems of plants require a continual supply of oxygen, the escape of the carbon dioxide that is released by the roots, water-retention in the soil and the available nutrients necessary for plant growth. Adding pumice to the soil helps meet all of those important requirements! Other features of using pumice in soils include: The porous nature of pumice allows it to hold vital nutrients in the microscopic surface pores, which helps regulate fertilizer feedings. Pumice rock includes trace amounts...

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Soil Tilth is a Good Thing!

October 09, 2014

Just what exactly is soil tilth? Soil that drains well, does not hard-crust over, absorbs water readily, and does not make dirt clods is said to have good “tilth”. It is the physical condition of the soil that makes tillage easy, offers good seedbed quality, promotes seedling emergence, and deep root penetration. One component of tilth is nature’s processes whereby soil particles are joined together into tiny clusters. These clusters, or aggregates, form in soils when individual soil particles are brought together through wetting and drying, freezing and thawing, and by plant growth and earthworm activity. In the case of earthworm-created aggregates, they are stable once they come out of the worm. Aggregates formed by physical forces becomes stabilized...

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